Dr. Burke is an optometrist practicing at Calgary Vision Centre.  He is nearsighted, but only 0.75D, which explains why he thinks he is such a handyman around the house. Opinions above do not constitute medical advice, and readers should consult with their optometrist if they have questions or concerns about their eye health

Dr. Burke is an optometrist practicing at Calgary Vision Centre.  He is nearsighted, but only 0.75D, which explains why he thinks he is such a handyman around the house. Opinions above do not constitute medical advice, and readers should consult with their optometrist if they have questions or concerns about their eye health

For close to a century, scientists have noted a clear association between intelligence and nearsightedness (myopia). The exact reason for this correlation isn't known, and theories attempting to explain it range from eye size and brain size being related (myopic eyes are bigger than average eyes), to strictly environmental factors.  There is also the question of what came first, the myopia or the IQ? Does being nearsighted allow you to read easier, and therefore foster a greater ability to learn? Or does being smart at birth predispose you to wanting to learn, and the act of learning through reading triggers the eyes to become nearsighted?  Whatever the mechanism, the associations seen between myopia and IQ are intriguing.